Myths of History

Myths of HistoryMYTHS!  Have you ever heard something repeated over and over again at different times by different people only to find out later that it wasn’t actually true?  This has certainly been true in my life.  This blog represents some of the bigger myths that we all grew up believing and repeating, but are in fact not true.

I have to be honest, now that I know the truth, it’s hard to hear these myths continually repeated. So, cheers! To setting the record straight.  Next time a friend or co-worker asserts one of these false myths, you will know better.

MYTH #1:  Charles Darwin invented the theory of Evolution.  By mere chance, his ship embarked on the Galapagos Islands where he discovered that everything we knew about creation was wrong.  He was the first to discover and write on this theory.

ANSWER:   Charles Darwin did not invent this theory, and the island was not a chance discovery.  The truth is that Darwin’s grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, taught and wrote extensively about the theory of evolution long before Charles was even born.  He even wrote a book on evolution called, “Zoonomia.”  In fact, Charles had read this book and others on the subject of evolution.  This topic created a great excitement in him as he became very fascinated in it.

Question to ponder:  If Darwin’s grandfather Erasmus and other family members already knew, accepted and taught evolution, then how could Charles have discovered and invented it by some random chance?  The truth is, the reason Charles went to the Galopocos Islands in the first place was to continue his grandfathers research.  In fact, Charles was reading “Zoonomia” on his way to the islands.

Additional fun facts to ponder:

#1.  There was a man named Alfred Wallace who was called the co-founder of the theory of evolution.  Darwin himself admitted as much before English Parliament.  Have you have thought about why Wallace isn’t ever mentioned?  Most likely because he was a Catholic who had far more scientific degrees than Darwin, and he saw that God was needed for evolution to happen.  He held that there could be naturalistic, materialist, or godless account of evolution.

#2.  Materialistic accounts (i.e. how life came about without God) were presented long before the Darwins.  For example, a proponent of this belief, named Epicurus, over 2000 years earlier had already taught and wrote about it. (If interested in learning more on this, read, “The Darwin Myth,” by Benjamin Wiker)

MYTH #2: The Dark Ages were a blank period of over a thousand years where learning and scientific growth stood still.  Education was non-existent.  People were ignorant, holding that the earth was flat and other such myths.  The Catholic Church had a stranglehold over the people preventing them from learning, growing, or being free.

ANSWER: Though most of us have learned these myths in school, they are fiction.  The truth is that the Catholic Church was not an impediment to education but the largest contributor to education.  Fact:  The Catholic Church started colleges/universities in the supposed “Dark Ages.”  The Church progressed education at all grades and levels.  English, science, math, history, philosophy and other subjects were all taught and cultivated.  Critical thinking was mandatory.  Secular classics were read and promoted.  Books that opposed Catholic teaching were used and read in school too.  Students were actually taught to study both sides of an issue and may even be called upon to argue the opposing viewpoint in a class debate.  They needed to know the other side.  So, it’s a myth to assert that Catholics weren’t allowed to learn anything except Catholic teaching and brainwashing.  It’s also a myth that the Church didn’t promote a well-rounded education, the very education we still have today.

In regards to the myth of science, the Catholic Church even studied science and put enormous amounts of money toward scientific discovery and progress.  This might come as a shock to some, but, there were many inventions, scientific discoveries, and much scientific progress throughout the Middle Ages, thanks to the Church.  In addition, it’s too little known that the Catholic Church invented law, economics, and many other things that we still rely on and take for granted today.  Consequently, many people in the Middle Ages (especially Christians) were not ignorant barbarians as some assert.  Education boomed and people were able to learn like never before in history, all thanks to the Catholic Church.

Myths of History

In regard to the myth of a flat earth, genuine historians today know this is a myth.  From working in public schools, I see that text books are already being revised to update this myth.  The truth is, most people knew the earth was round in and even before the Middle Ages.  People like St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Albert the Great, Roger Bacon and many others knew it and even wrote about it.  As Benjamin Wiker says, these people “Even knew the approximate size of the circumference of the earth. They set it at about 29,000 miles (the actual size being about 24,000 miles).”  Not bad without any modern technology!  And, here’s the kicker; people like Ptolemy, Aristotle, St. Augustine and St. Jerome, to name a few, knew that the earth was round centuries and centuries before the Middle Ages!  So, let’s put this myth to rest for good.  (If interested in learning more on this, read, “How the Catholic Church built Western Civilization,” by Thomas Woods).

MYTH #3: Margaret Sanger was a great, moral woman who revolutionized life for all women everywhere.  She ended their slavery and empowered them.  Thanks to Sanger, marriage and family was made better for everyone.

ANSWER: Believe it or not, the opposite is true.  The real Margaret Sanger of history was a crazy radical who believed in eugenics and a master race.  Eugenics seeks to perfect the human race by weeding out the weaker classes (usually blacks, Jews, aborigines, etc.) while fostering the growth of the more fit classes.  The goal of eugenics is to stop the poor, weak, dumb and “moronic” people from procreating, all while promoting more procreation among the more mentally and physically fit.  The goal is a more rapid growth and evolution of the human race.  Does this sound a little like Adolf Hitler and the Nazi’s?  That’s because Hitler and Sanger were on the same page and held the same ideology.

The truth is, Hitler didn’t always believe in the madness we know him for.  He actually learned eugenics from England and the United States.  Thomas Huxely, Havelock Ellis, Margaret Sanger and other comrades all promoted and spread this belief of Eucgenics.  And guess, what?  That’s where Hitler learned it from.  Fact: Margaret Sanger started Planned Parenthood, and people who served on the board of Planned Parenthood also served and worked with Adolf Hitler.  In fact, Hitler was inspired so much by one of Sanger’s board members, Lothrop Stoddard, that he used one of Stoddard’s books in Germany and made all the kids read it school.

Myths of HistorySo, yes, Sanger was a crazy radical feminist who believed wholeheartedly in eugenics and a Master Race.  Why do you think she invented birth control in the first place?  For the purpose of eugenics!  To prevent poor and unevolved people (usually blacks) from procreating while allowing the more fit and well off people to procreate more.  Another Fact:  Margaret was not a nice person.  She was utterly against hospitals, charities, and those organizations that kept unfit people alive, preventing the growth of the human race.  Don’t believe me?  Check out the Planned Parenthood website.  You will have to dig deep to find it, but their website clearly states that Sanger believed and promoted eugenics.  That’s the real Margaret Sanger of history.  Stay tuned for two full blog posts on Margaret Sanger, Adolf Hitler, and eugenics.

 

About Bryan Mercier

Bryan Mercier is a thirty-eight year old speaker and retreat leader. He has spoken to adults and teens for the last fifteen years on a wide variety of topics; ranging from catechetics and faith formation, to morality, spirituality, and apologetics. He has spoken at youth and adult retreats, workshops, seminars, Catholic schools, parish missions, local, regional and national conferences. He has spoken in front of crowds ranging from thirty to three-thousand and has been aired on both TV and radio in different states. Bryan also runs the R.O.C.K. (Revival Of Catholic Kids) Ministry Team that puts on all-day retreats for teens. He is going for his Masters in theology and working on writing numerous books and tracts.
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One Response to Myths of History

  1. Antonio says:

    Bryan, you’re a bit confused.
    I’d really like to discuss these and other issues with you, but being in portugal and considering your rates, it is just unlikely to say the least.
    disclaimer: I am a catholic, having studied in a jesuit highschool, active member of christian youth institutions, half a dozen pilgrimages to Fatima and one to Santiago (Compustela).
    I like where your coming for, but your missing the point… maybe it’s great in the states, but where I come from one tends to dig a little deeper.
    with Darwin you’re using an old technique of discrediting a theory by discrediting its author. I’m sorry, but darwin was right. The Pope acknowledge it already… unfortunately Darwin couldn’t see that in the begining there was always God. don’t fight it, embrace it. From where I stand you’re the one lowering your position in the argument by focusing on secondary things. and what good does it make you? under the name “myth” your calling Darwin a liar. to what good? not very christianlike.
    As to the dark ages… although I recognize the importance of the Church – to some extent, the fact is we had people such as Pope Alexander VI (Rodrigo Borgia, father to the Cesar and Lucrecia) governing the Church for their own benefit. The Church was collecting indulgences instead of providing for the poor. Not to mention the inquisition – and yes, the inquisition is not a myth, I’m portuguese, believe me, I know.
    Yes, there were some religious orders doing really great stuff, but the Church itself not that many – leading to the Martin Luther’s split, for example. It is an undeniable historical fact.
    When saying the Church promoted critical thinking (you called it mandatory… based on?), you seem to forget only a few (so very few) were educated – and although all round education, it was not very openminded, the remainder were left wondering while listening to mass in latin, not understanding the words let alone the message.
    I would really like to discuss this with you, I think you may be either misguided or trying to mislead. the first is unfortunate, the second is unwarranted. Moreimportantly, your atacking the so called “myths” to what purpose?

    I really hope to hear from you.

    abraço from Lisbon

    Antonio

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